Climb on top of Etna Volcano, the highest active volcano in Europe!

Easy guide to learn how  to safely climb up the highest active Volcano in Europe. A perfect day trip from Taormina or Catania.

Why you shouldn’t miss Etna Volcano

You have surely seen mount Etna as the landscape of Taormina Greek theater. It’s an iconic view that can be seen in all postcards in Sicily and that makes Etna one of Sicily most popular destinations. That could already be a good reason to see the stuff with your own eyes!

The Greek theater and mount Etna

That said, there are many other reasons that make Etna Volcano is an experience not to be missed when visiting Sicily.

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Taormina in one day: what to do and see and where to stay

Taormina in one day: the Greek theater and mount Etna
The Greek theater and mount Etna

An easy itinerary to discover what to do in Taormina in one day, including the medieval hamlet, the Greek theater and the astonishing views on Etna Volcano

It’s pretty easy to explore Taormina in one day, even though once you discover this delightful Sicilian hamlet you will certainly be tempted to spend there much more time. Two or three days would be perfect, also to enjoy Taormina breathtaking beaches.

French writer Guy de Maupassant used to say: “Should you only have one day to spend in Sicily and you ask me ‘what is there to see?’ I would reply ‘Taormina’ without any hesitation. It is only a landscape but one in which you can find everything that seems to have been created to seduce the eyes, the mind and the imagination.” 

Indeed, Taormina is one of the most amazing  destinations in Sicily and, arguably, in the world. Where else would you be able to sit on a 23 centuries old Greek theater, built on a natural terrace overlooking the deep blue Ionian sea,  with the highest European volcano snowy peak on the horizon?

Taormina is not only a delightfully medieval village with astonishing views and sights, but it is also famous for its beaches, including the Isola Bella, a tiny island connected to the main land by a narrow stretch of land that can only be seen if the tide is low. Visiting Taormina in one day (or, ideally, two or three) will allow you to wonderfully combine seaside, culture and entertainment.

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Noto Sicily, baroque perfection

Discover Noto, a delightful small town that hosts some of the best baroque monuments of the entire Sicily

 

A UNESCO Heritage site, Noto is a destination not to be missed in your Sicily tour.

The original town (“Noto Antica”) was completely destroyed by the terrible 1693 earthquake (you can still visit its fascinating ruins, a few Kilometers away from the “modern” Noto).

Noto was then rebuilt from scratch, in the sublime elegance, originality and fantasy of the Sicilian Baroque style.

Noto Sicily is very easy to visit. Simply wander the length of the Corso Vittorio Emanuele, along which many of Noto’s most representative buildings stand. And if you feel lazy in a hot Sicilian summer day, have a tourist ride in a delightful APE (typical Italian motorized tricycle).

Noto Sicily_tourist public transport

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Siracusa: Sicily at its best

Siracusa_eagle

 

Discover Siracusa, a top destination in Sicily, with over 24 centuries of history, art and culture

 

Siracusa is an ancient town on the sea, which was of immense importance as Greek Syracuse. It has a superb archaeological zone and a lovely historic center on the island of Ortigia. It’s one of the 41 UNESCO heritage Italian sites and can be an excellent hub to visit south eastern Sicily: the Baroque towns of Ragusa and Noto, the protected beaches of Vendicari, the gorges of Cavagrande, the lively city of Catania and the Etna volcano.

The city’s finest sight is the superb Archaeological Park of Neapolis, (25 minutes walk from the center of the town).

Siracusa_teatro greco

Siracusa’s Greek theatre (Teatro Greco) is one of the finest and largest of its kind. Cut directly into the rock, it was enlarged and modified several times over the centuries, and is still in use today – Greek plays are performed here in May and June each year.

Siracusa_...

The deep quarry to the east of the theater is called the Latomia del Paradiso (Paradise Quarry), and it’s a peaceful and green spot, filled with vegetation and lemon trees. The most famous sight here is the huge cave called the Ear of Dionysius (Orecchio di Dionisio).

Siracusa_orecchio di Dionisio

Apparently it was Caravaggio who coined the name; the connection with Dionysius is the story that this ruler of ancient Syracuse used to eavesdrop on his prisoners incarcerated here, thanks to the cave’s acoustics. A second cave nearby, the Grotta dei Cordari was used by the ropemakers who gave the place its name.

Outside the main park, but included in the ticket, is the Roman Amphitheater (Anfiteatro Romano).

Siracusa_Neapolis_anfiteatro romano

Once you’ve seen Siracusa’s fine mainland archaeological sights, the most pleasant place to spend the rest of your stay is the island of Ortigia, Siracusa’s heart for thousands of years.

Much of the island’s charm lies in wandering down narrow medieval lanes, past romantically-crumbling – or lovingly-restored – Baroque palaces and churches.

Siracusa_old street

Siracusa_pop houses

To head straight to Ortigia’s most attractive piazza, turn right and head for Via Cavour (which continues as Via Landolina), a narrow thoroughfare lined with restaurants and souvenir shops. At its end lies Piazza Duomo, an elliptical open space lined with harmonious and impressive buildings.

Siracusa_Cathedral square

Siracusa_cathedral square 2

Siracusa_cathedral square 3

Siracusa_courtyard 2

Sracusa_architectural detail

Siracusa’s Duomo is one of the town’s most celebrated sights. Once it was the Greek Temple of Athena, with a giant gold statue of the goddess on its roof. The massive Doric columns of the temple are still visible. The wall above the columns along Via Minerva, with battlements, is Norman in origin, while the fancy Baroque facade was a replacement after the 1693 earthquake.

Siracusa_Cathedral

Siracusa_statue

Siracusa_cathedral 2

Inside, the Duomo, is even more fascinating, since you discover the original structure of the ancient Greek temple (this make Siracusa’s duomo a monument absolutely unique).

Siracusa_cathedral insight3

Siracusa_cathedral insight2

Continuing your tour, head towards the thirteenth-century Castello Maniace, the fortress at the island’s tip. The route from here back to the Duomo, along the seafront to the Fonte Aretusa, is adorned with several bars and restaurants and is a nice place for a summer evening promenade and, close to the castle, for a swim and a sun bath.

Siracusa_Courtyard

Siracusa_Sunbathing

Siarusa_seaside restaurants

The Fonte Aretusa (on the western shore) is a fresh-water spring whose history goes back to the earliest Greek colonists. Surrounded by high stone walls, planted with papyrus and inhabited by white ducks, the spring is an important spot on the Ortigia promenade.

Fonte Aretusa

In summertime, the island of Ortigia is a very lively place, with both locals and tourists strolling around to benefit from the freshness of the evening and to the many shows that take place in the squares.

Siracusa_night street artist

If you have a car and are looking for a place to combine seaside relaxing and cultural visit, you may consider staying at the Villa Fisher Bed & Breakfast, build right on a cliff, 15′ driving from Ortigia (Tip: use a navigator to reach it, especially if you arrive after sunset!).

Siracusa_villa Fisher

Siracusa_sea from villa Fisher

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